Desirability design

Desirability design is like emotional design. It aims at stimulating a person to want to use something, first when they see the box, then when the open it, and later when they have finished using it.

Ultimately, the desirabality of the page should increase by making it easy to use. Like a helpful person, it should communicate clearly and understandably , yet be likable to the person who will use it. When they see it, they should want to use it. After they’ve used it, they need to want to use it more. They need to be reminded of it in a way that if they think back to it, they would want to experience it again. In some design cases, the balance can shift from a usable design to a more visually stimulating way. Some designs are even built less user-friendly on purpose, in order to get more revenue.

For example, an article page might be filled with ads in between, or split up over several pages in order to make the user visit more pages (with different ads). (Which brings up the question of the effect of rotating ads in one place, and actually the effectiveness of page ads in general) . Some vagueness or white lie might be necessary to achieve success.

For example, the title of an article might be ‘bended’ in the right way, in order that the user is tricked enough for him to click the ‘read more’ link. After all every design is built to gain (product) success, by manipulating emotion.

For example, a sales site (for few products) might delibrately not have a search feature. If there is a search, it should include promo’s.

For example, the contact form or contact details might be hidden. Business requirements and testing their risks/consequences..

Whatever the case may be, an equilibrium must be found. Balacing business goals and user goals, where aesthetics and usability complement eachother. How can we show ads but maintain calmness? In the end, the user experience as a whole must not suffer. Affect the user emotionally negatively, and the user’s goodwill goes down.

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